I Tiptoe Around (Some) Empowered Women in Literature and TV

This semester, I’ve been studying American Indian Survivance Discourse. I’ve been studying code-switching and the importance of diversity in voice through minority writing. I’ve been studying transgender literature. Fairy tale literature. LGBQ literature. It’s beautiful.

Most recently, I’ve been studying the poet Adrienne Rich. While all the subjects I put in my head this semester has had an impact on me, to varying degrees, Rich never ceases to explode my thought. Boom. And the kicker is, I studied her seven years ago with similar effect. Her insights are mind-curling, deep and twisting and nearly self-aware. And she made sense, on Thursday, in a way that fit something I’ve been thinking about for a while.

She said that for her to be a truly independent woman writer, she had to stop using men’s sensibilities and styles while writing.

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A Short Bit From Corpus Paradiso

After slogging through disconnect and diabetic infirmary, I woke with my words wrapped snugly around me. I endeavored to write a difficult passage, and found it exactly what I sought.

I wanted to share!

Quick backstory: Susursal is trapped in dream-wanderings, and having just escaped a nightmare scenario where he was forced to live two mundane lives of gardening and housecleaning for what he perceives as “hundreds of years,” he’s wandering the ruins of his ancestral memory.

He has two gods: God and Lalatu, a Hecate-esque god of possibility that lives on the moon. Ineluctable Man is a representation of many things; his failings, his shadow self, a mythological Everyman, an outside influence that he has brought in, or childhood sleep paralysis issues. Continue reading

Writing to Scare Yourself

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Reading Simmons on the beach.

(Still love this pic. Wish I was still there)

 

I have one finalized and unpublished novel, four finished rough novels, forty eight unfinished projects, seventeen research files, and countless lost projects. My titles are, from my first novel project in 7th grade to now (including fanfic): Dinotopia!, Elementals, Lucky Sevens, Spark, the Mindgames Trilogy, Inhabitability, Infallibility, The Willow and the Sycamore, the seven Reverberant high fantasy novels that followed, the four planned Littrell sequels, Symbiosis, Of Salt and Wine and the six sequels planned, The Acorn King and sequel, David and His Shade and four sequels planned, Pris(m), Alexandrea, Nautilus, and Corpus Paradiso (my NaNo project).

I started my writing life piggybacking off other writers and other worlds, learning my basics by simply parroting. My parents told me my writing work was great. I won second place in 7th grade and first place in 8th for a pair of short stories written across two pages. When I was young and learning to write I was afraid just to put a word down. Words written meant you owned them. They meant you had an idea and you put it out there for others to read.

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Batman VS. Superman was Phenomenal

…despite so many critiques to the contrary.

SPOILERS SPOIILERS SPOILERS.

Why did I feel BVS was phenomenal? This will probably be a long post, so grab some popcorn and be aware of spoilers. BECAUSE I WILL SPOIL IT FOR EVERYONE.

For those of you who don’t care about lengthy one-sided discussion, I’ll lay it out nice and clean, without examples, so you may continue on your way.

Multi-faceted protagonists, including Superman; strong, aware antagonists, including Doomsday (Kidding about Doomsday. Dude was just straight up mad); complex plot that allowed characters to develop, including non-super ones, a world that existed before the movie began; philosophically sound motivations that were succinctly explained and developed; appropriate insights to characters through skilled storytelling; great filming, particularly in the beginning and at the end.

After explaining all this, I’ll try and hunt down why people are so disgusted by the movie.

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Using D&D to Understand Story

I haven’t been around for a while, and for that I apologize. I’m trying for a resurgence to this site, and writing in general. So hello.

 

This post has everything to do with my very, very amateur status in the world of Dungeons & Dragons. After studying the 5th Edition rulebooks, I recognize a deep vein of development that has been present since, well, I was born.

I’m falling into the D&D Dungeon Master development in a way I didn’t expect: I find studying a campaign actually improves my inspiration toward writing, and understanding a well-developed story, more adequately.

This is both a good and bad thing. The good is I am forced to develop peripheral aspects in a unique and new way, and in applying this to my book-writing, I find the world more saturated with individuality. The bad is I’m forced to cast aside my previous style of writing, which was unconventional, different, unique.

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I Fell In Love With an Antihero

Le Sad Clown Quixote

Le Sad Clown Quixote

I don’t write much here anymore. But I will write more soon. Much more. If you read me often, you’ll know it’s because of my job: it takes up all my thoughts and energy, and by the time I get home in the afternoon/evening, I don’t have much left to dedicate to other thought. I’m one of those strange people who need to live a balanced life: up time and down time. So instead of writing, I make dinner, or unwind some other way. Go on dates.

One of those dates incorporated watching a recent release, Seventh Son, with a Don Quixote-lookin’ Jeff Bridges mumbling into dragon mouths and the guy from Stardust proving he could wrestle witches with the best of them. Spoilers aside, I give it a five. I think it’s two movies smashed into one. The bad guys are ten times cooler than the good guys.

It highlit a trend I’ve been seeing in movies, TV series, and books of late: the evolution of the antihero. I like it. I want to talk about it.

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Let’s Talk About Heaven, a Trope

I’m an avid follower of the great metaphoricals, the bold believers. A follower of fantasists that, through their writing, create reality in strange and unique ways. Dante is one. Milton is another. Both wrote about hell, the loss of earth, and heaven. Both are immortalized as non-canonical influences to our religious perspectives.

When someone says, “Tell me of Satan,” most people talk about red horns and tail, cunning and beautiful and exotic and evil. This perspective didn’t exist before Milton’s Paradise Lost. Yet it is rarely attributed to the writer. It is assumed, somewhere in the Bible, a description exists to vitalize this image. It isn’t true. Most divells in pre-Milton literature were impish things, grotesqueries, like goblins or bats.

Image taken from the Codex Gigas, an illustrated "all-in-one" bible complete with spells and incantations to ward off evil. Written sometime in the 12th Century by a monk.

Image taken from the Codex Gigas, an illustrated “all-in-one” bible complete with spells and incantations to ward off evil. Written sometime in the 12th Century by a monk.

But this post isn’t about hell. It’s about a much more difficult subject to write well: heaven.

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